Archives for the month of: October, 2017

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I recently received an promotional email (no personalized salutation) from an indie author saying she noticed I’d reviewed a book similar to one she had just written and if she sent me a free e-pub edition would I be interested in reviewing hers?

What interested me was how she went about selecting reviewers? It must be an onerous task to go through reviewers on Amazon, even after applying the appropriate filters in regards to genre, and extract their emails. And once you have them there is no guarantee they’re going to review your book, or for that matter give you a good review.

So I agreed to review her book on the condition she tell me how she got my email address and any other tips she might have on marketing. To sweeten the deal I even purchased her book, very uncharacteristic for me.

She responded favorably and has been very forthcoming. Here’s what she has undertaken so far in producing and marketing her novel.

She says she wrote this book, her second in a series, taking into consideration the requirements and preferences of traditional publishers because she thought she might approach agents and traditional publishers with it.

“In the end, after reading several articles and consulting with the other authors in my two writers’ groups, I decided that self-publishing is actually the better option. If you’re interested in my reasoning, let me know.”

I am interested and will be asking her why she’d turn down a traditional publisher to become a self-publisher? Her previous book was also self-published so it’s not like she switched.

So how did she come up with my name and email address and those of other reviewers?

The answer is she bought a Book Review Targeter app for $200 (lots are available on the internet).

It works like this – you choose as many books as you want that you feel are similar to yours and receive what’s essentially an excel list of all the people who reviewed those books. The vast majority don’t have an email address but there are plenty that do.

So what to do with those email addresses?

She down loaded an app called Group Mailer because it makes sending out group emails easy.

So how is she doing?

“In about three days I’ve had about forty-five people agree to read and review a free version of the book and an additional twenty who declined the free copy and purchased the book to review it.”

Now that’s impressive, not the forty-five who agreed to review it, but the twenty who declined a free review copy and bought one. Who are these people?

She says she has another three or four lists (from additional similar books) she has yet process.

She’ll be running a 99¢ campaign for the e-book edition for two days on Amazon and one day free book promotions on Pretty-Hot Books and Discountbookman, spending ten dollars for a featured promotion on bookreadermagazine and running a giveaway on Goodreads.

She also has had no problem asking friends, colleagues and clients to buy her book and she anticipates reviews from about twenty percent of them.

She’s asked the other writers in her writers’ groups to share information about her book on their Facebook pages and has started looking for blogs to ask bloggers to mention it.

If that isn’t enough, and it probably isn’t, she’s considering spending $720 to have BookBub promote her book. BookBub claims the campaign will sell 2700 books, and the members in her writers’ groups unanimously support these stats saying they’ve received three times the return on their investment with such a promotion.

There’s a caveat here – BookBub only accepts professionally produced, error free books. They seldom accept new releases, preferring you have a proven track record with reviews. If you qualify be prepared to cut your price to the bone. Even if you want to promote with BookBub you may not make the grade.

To produce her book she hired two beta readers at $50 each and got a book cover artist from her writers’ group to design her cover for $65. No editor was needed as she just happens to be one herself.

So far her hard costs have been $375. Results are pending.

A lot of what she’s doing I’ve done:
– I have an Advance Reading Team e-mail list of a little over 200 who receive my new books free to stimulate buzz and encourage reviews.
– I have offered giveaway promotions on Goodreads, LibraryThing and BookLikes.
– I send a press release to local media offering them a book in return for a review
– I blog, and promote on Facebook and Twitter
– I have three beta readers who read my books free and are recognized on the book’s Acknowledgement Page.
– I edit my own books and design my own covers

Some of what she’s doing I’ll never do.

I have never solicited family, friends, colleagues or clients to buy my books. In my opinion it’s unprofessional. Besides I want my books to be bought because they’re well written and entertaining, not out some misguided obligation or as as way for someone to ingratiate themselves to me.

My hard costs on my last book were zero.

And so have the results.

Of course, there’s always the elephant in the room – the quality of the book.

I’m watching how this book launch does and hoping I can learn something. Maybe you will as well.

Speaking of book marketing…

CreatorCollabs Boosted Tweets
So out of the blue I get a promotional tweet about CreatorCollabs (CC) Boosted Tweets. Basically, post a tweet and share it on CC. Other CC users see your Tweet and share it with their online audiences. In-turn, you need to share content created by others to ensure your points stay high to continue to get access for your tweets.

There’s a free and paid plan. Of course, I used the free one.

For a week I loaded Tweets about my plays, Harry’s Truth and End of the Rope, available free on Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin until December 31, 2017. In return I retweeted content about the books of other authors.

They have a stats bar so you can check how many people you’re apparently reaching. Here’s the results of one of my tweets.
– The number of retweets my tweet received from my own twitter followers = 0.
– The number of retweets my tweet received through CreatorCollabs Community = 7
(increase 700%)
– Number of my followers my tweet reached = 50
– Number of followers my tweet reached through CreatorCollabs Community = 10,131
(Increase 20,262%)

Increase in books sales in response to this enormous increase in reach = 0
Increase in activity on my website and book sales platforms = negligible.

Just another case of nobody being interested in anyone (or their books) but themselves – including me.

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

Web addresses associated with this article:

BookBub https://www.bookbub.com/home/overview.php
Book Reader Magazine http://bookreadermagazine.com/
Discount Book Man http://discountbookman.com/
Pretty-Hot.Com http://pretty-hot.com/
Groupmail http://group-mail.com/

30

Author Amazon Page
https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013287676486

 

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The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers - John Gardner

 

 I recently received an promotional email (no personalized salutation) from an indie author saying she noticed I’d reviewed a book similar to one she had just written and if she sent me a free e-pub edition would I be interested in reviewing hers?

 

What interested me was how she went about selecting reviewers? It must be an onerous task to go through reviewers on Amazon, even after applying the appropriate filters in regards to genre, and extract their emails. And once you have them there is no guarantee they’re going to review your book, or for that matter give you a good review.

 

So I agreed to review her book on the condition she tell me how she got my email address and any other tips she might have on marketing. To sweeten the deal I even purchased her book, very uncharacteristic for me.

 

She responded favorably and has been very forthcoming. Here’s what she has undertaken so far in producing and marketing her novel.

 

She says she wrote this book, her second in a series, taking into consideration the requirements and preferences of traditional publishers because she thought she might approach agents and traditional publishers with it.

 

“In the end, after reading several articles and consulting with the other authors in my two writers’ groups, I decided that self-publishing is actually the better option. If you’re interested in my reasoning, let me know.”

 

I am interested and will be asking her why she’d turn down a traditional publisher to become a self-publisher? Her previous book was also self-published so it’s not like she switched.

 

So how did she come up with my name and email address and those of other reviewers?

 

The answer is she bought a Book Review Targeter app for $200 (lots are available on the internet).

 

It works like this – you choose as many books as you want that you feel are similar to yours and receive what’s essentially an excel list of all the people who reviewed those books. The vast majority don’t have an email address but there are plenty that do.

 

So what to do with those email addresses?

 

She down loaded an app called Group Mailer because it makes sending out group emails easy.

 

So how is she doing?

 

“In about three days I’ve had about forty-five people agree to read and review a free version of the book and an additional twenty who declined the free copy and purchased the book to review it.”

 

Now that’s impressive, not the forty-five who agreed to review it, but the twenty who declined a free review copy and bought one. Who are these people?

 

She says she has another three or four lists (from additional similar books) she has yet process.

 

She’ll be running a 99¢ campaign for the e-book edition for two days on Amazon and one day free book promotions on Pretty-Hot Books and Discountbookman, spending ten dollars for a featured promotion on bookreadermagazine and running a giveaway on Goodreads.

 

She also has had no problem asking friends, colleagues and clients to buy her book and she anticipates reviews from about twenty percent of them.

 

She’s asked the other writers in her writers’ groups to share information about her book on their Facebook pages and has started looking for blogs to ask bloggers to mention it.

 

If that isn’t enough, and it probably isn’t, she’s considering spending $720 to have BookBub promote her book. BookBub claims the campaign will sell 2700 books, and the members in her writers’ groups unanimously support these stats saying they’ve received three times the return on their investment with such a promotion.

 

There’s a caveat here – BookBub only accepts professionally produced, error free books. They seldom accept new releases, preferring you have a proven track record with reviews. If you qualify be prepared to cut your price to the bone. Even if you want to promote with BookBub you may not make the grade.

 

To produce her book she hired two beta readers at $50 each and got a book cover artist from her writers’ group to design her cover for $65. No editor was needed as she just happens to be one herself.

 

So far her hard costs have been $375. Results are pending.

 

A lot of what she’s doing I’ve done:

– I have an Advance Reading Team e-mail list of a little over 200 who receive my new books free to stimulate buzz and encourage reviews.

– I have run giveaway promotions on Goodreads, LibraryThing and BookLikes.

– I send a press release to local media offering them a book in return for a review

– I blog, and promote on Facebook and Twitter

– I have three beta readers who read my books free and are recognized on the book’s Acknowledgement Page.

– I edit my own books and design my own covers

 

Some of what she’s doing I’ll never do.

 

I have never solicited family, friends, colleagues or clients to buy my books. In my opinion it’s unprofessional. Besides I want my books to be bought because they’re well written and entertaining, not out some misguided obligation or as as way for someone to ingratiate themselves to me.

 

My hard costs on my last book were zero.

 

And so have the results.

 

Of course, there’s always the elephant in the room – the quality of the book.

 

I’m watching how this book launch does and hoping I can learn something. Maybe you will as well.

 

Speaking of book marketing…

 

CreatorCollabs Boosted Tweets

 

So out of the blue I get a promotional tweet about CreatorCollabs (CC) Boosted Tweets. Basically, post a tweet and share it on CC. Other CC users see your Tweet and share it with their online audiences. In-turn, you need to share content created by others to ensure your points stay high to continue to get access for your tweets.

 

There’s a free and paid plan. Of course, I used the free one.

 

For a week I loaded Tweets about my plays, Harry’s Truth and End of the Rope, available free on Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin until December 31, 2017. In return I retweeted content about the books of other authors.

 

They have a stats bar so you can check how many people you’re apparently reaching. Here’s the results of one of my tweets.

– The number of retweets my tweet received from my own twitter followers = 0.

– The number of retweets my tweet received through CreatorCollabs Community = 7

(increase 700%)

– Number of my followers my tweet reached = 50

– Number of followers my tweet reached through CreatorCollabs Community = 10,131

(Increase 20,262%)

 

Increase in books sales in response to this enormous increase in reach = 0

Increase in activity on my website and book sales platforms = negligible.

 

Just another case of nobody being interested in anyone (or their books) but themselves – including me.

 

 

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

 

Web addresses associated with this article:

 

BookBub https://www.bookbub.com/home/overview.php

Book Reader Magazine http://bookreadermagazine.com/

Discount Book Man http://discountbookman.com/

Pretty-Hot.Com http://pretty-hot.com/

Groupmail http://group-mail.com/

Smashwords   https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin

 

30

 

Author Amazon Page

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013287676486 –

 

 

 

Original post:
rodraglin.booklikes.com/post/1609167/a-book-launch-case-study

The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers - John Gardner

 

 I recently received an promotional email (no personalized salutation) from an indie author saying she noticed I’d reviewed a book similar to one she had just written and if she sent me a free e-pub edition would I be interested in reviewing hers?

 

What interested me was how she went about selecting reviewers? It must be an onerous task to go through reviewers on Amazon, even after applying the appropriate filters in regards to genre, and extract their emails. And once you have them there is no guarantee they’re going to review your book, or for that matter give you a good review.

 

So I agreed to review her book on the condition she tell me how she got my email address and any other tips she might have on marketing. To sweeten the deal I even purchased her book, very uncharacteristic for me.

 

She responded favorably and has been very forthcoming. Here’s what she has undertaken so far in producing and marketing her novel.

 

She says she wrote this book, her second in a series, taking into consideration the requirements and preferences of traditional publishers because she thought she might approach agents and traditional publishers with it.

 

“In the end, after reading several articles and consulting with the other authors in my two writers’ groups, I decided that self-publishing is actually the better option. If you’re interested in my reasoning, let me know.”

 

I am interested and will be asking her why she’d turn down a traditional publisher to become a self-publisher? Her previous book was also self-published so it’s not like she switched.

 

So how did she come up with my name and email address and those of other reviewers?

 

The answer is she bought a Book Review Targeter app for $200 (lots are available on the internet).

 

It works like this – you choose as many books as you want that you feel are similar to yours and receive what’s essentially an excel list of all the people who reviewed those books. The vast majority don’t have an email address but there are plenty that do.

 

So what to do with those email addresses?

 

She down loaded an app called Group Mailer because it makes sending out group emails easy.

 

So how is she doing?

 

“In about three days I’ve had about forty-five people agree to read and review a free version of the book and an additional twenty who declined the free copy and purchased the book to review it.”

 

Now that’s impressive, not the forty-five who agreed to review it, but the twenty who declined a free review copy and bought one. Who are these people?

 

She says she has another three or four lists (from additional similar books) she has yet process.

 

She’ll be running a 99¢ campaign for the e-book edition for two days on Amazon and one day free book promotions on Pretty-Hot Books and Discountbookman, spending ten dollars for a featured promotion on bookreadermagazine and running a giveaway on Goodreads.

 

She also has had no problem asking friends, colleagues and clients to buy her book and she anticipates reviews from about twenty percent of them.

 

She’s asked the other writers in her writers’ groups to share information about her book on their Facebook pages and has started looking for blogs to ask bloggers to mention it.

 

If that isn’t enough, and it probably isn’t, she’s considering spending $720 to have BookBub promote her book. BookBub claims the campaign will sell 2700 books, and the members in her writers’ groups unanimously support these stats saying they’ve received three times the return on their investment with such a promotion.

 

There’s a caveat here – BookBub only accepts professionally produced, error free books. They seldom accept new releases, preferring you have a proven track record with reviews. If you qualify be prepared to cut your price to the bone. Even if you want to promote with BookBub you may not make the grade.

 

To produce her book she hired two beta readers at $50 each and got a book cover artist from her writers’ group to design her cover for $65. No editor was needed as she just happens to be one herself.

 

So far her hard costs have been $375. Results are pending.

 

A lot of what she’s doing I’ve done:

– I have an Advance Reading Team e-mail list of a little over 200 who receive my new books free to stimulate buzz and encourage reviews.

– I have run giveaway promotions on Goodreads, LibraryThing and BookLikes.

– I send a press release to local media offering them a book in return for a review

– I blog, and promote on Facebook and Twitter

– I have three beta readers who read my books free and are recognized on the book’s Acknowledgement Page.

– I edit my own books and design my own covers

 

Some of what she’s doing I’ll never do.

 

I have never solicited family, friends, colleagues or clients to buy my books. In my opinion it’s unprofessional. Besides I want my books to be bought because they’re well written and entertaining, not out some misguided obligation or as as way for someone to ingratiate themselves to me.

 

My hard costs on my last book were zero.

 

And so have the results.

 

Of course, there’s always the elephant in the room – the quality of the book.

 

I’m watching how this book launch does and hoping I can learn something. Maybe you will as well.

 

Speaking of book marketing…

 

CreatorCollabs Boosted Tweets

 

So out of the blue I get a promotional tweet about CreatorCollabs (CC) Boosted Tweets. Basically, post a tweet and share it on CC. Other CC users see your Tweet and share it with their online audiences. In-turn, you need to share content created by others to ensure your points stay high to continue to get access for your tweets.

 

There’s a free and paid plan. Of course, I used the free one.

 

For a week I loaded Tweets about my plays, Harry’s Truth and End of the Rope, available free on Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin until December 31, 2017. In return I retweeted content about the books of other authors.

 

They have a stats bar so you can check how many people you’re apparently reaching. Here’s the results of one of my tweets.

– The number of retweets my tweet received from my own twitter followers = 0.

– The number of retweets my tweet received through CreatorCollabs Community = 7

(increase 700%)

– Number of my followers my tweet reached = 50

– Number of followers my tweet reached through CreatorCollabs Community = 10,131

(Increase 20,262%)

 

Increase in books sales in response to this enormous increase in reach = 0

Increase in activity on my website and book sales platforms = negligible.

 

Just another case of nobody being interested in anyone (or their books) but themselves – including me.

 

 

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

 

Web addresses associated with this article:

 

BookBub https://www.bookbub.com/home/overview.php

Book Reader Magazine http://bookreadermagazine.com/

Discount Book Man http://discountbookman.com/

Pretty-Hot.Com http://pretty-hot.com/

Groupmail http://group-mail.com/

Smashwords   https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin

 

30

 

Author Amazon Page

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013287676486 –

 

 

 

Original post:
rodraglin.booklikes.com/post/1609167/a-book-launch-case-study

 

I appreciate the mystery genre has dozens of sub genres with sleuths whose expertise, as well as solving murders, include operating bake shops, book stores, and thrift shops just to name a few. For some the setting is equally as important as the detective with an incredible amount of murders taking place in quaint British villages, on cruise ships and in exotic locales. Still others feature cats or dogs that partner with their owners in solving the crime, and some even get help from gumshoe ghosts.

 

So I was receptive to Yoga for Detectives: Interconnected by A. E. Prero, whose protagonist practices yoga and is the owner of a yoga school in Manhattan, as well as an amateur detective.

 

The term suspension of disbelief has been defined as “a willingness to suspend one’s critical faculties and believe the unbelievable; sacrifice of realism and logic for the sake of enjoyment.”

 

I have to admit I’m a bit of a fanatic when it comes to suspension of disbelief in any type of novel. As soon as I have one of those moments where something illogical happens that belies common sense or the protagonist does something totally out of character the story’s credibility becomes compromised. When the story is compromised so is my appreciation and enjoyment of it.

 

In Yoga for Detectives: Interconnected this began right away. I had pause with the way Jaya, the protagonist and a practitioner of a discipline that’s leads to self-discovery, self-mastery and self-realization, responded to her stepmother with insults, profanity and intense anger.

 

After beginning with the stepmother incident the real story starts when Maria, described as a friend, approaches Jaya and tells her that her brother in Lima, Peru has gone missing after finding something while cleaning out his grandmother’s apartment after her death.

 

On the strength of that Ansui, the yoga master at Jaya’s school immediately boards a jet and flies there. The next day Jaya receives an email from Ansui telling her to round up her crew and catch a flight to New Delhi.

 

Incredibly, Jaya agrees and not only that, she decides to take some young teens and their grandmother along as well. The fact the children would likely be an impediment to the investigation and might even be in danger is briefly discussed and summarily dismissed.

I can’t help but wonder who is picking up the tab to search for a young man his own sister describes as ” a troublemaker”, “unreliable”, “no stranger to the police” and “in and out of their offices many times”, but more to the point, why are they committed to look for him?

 

The why is provided by Ansui once the decision to fly everyone to Delhi has been made, which is kind backwards if you ask me – motivation usually prompts action rather than the opposite.

 

Ansui provides a recording that suggests St. Francis, yes, that St. Francis, is responsible for some dire deed that happened over four hundred and fifty years ago, though no evidence whatsoever is provided.

 

Why, this reader wondered, would Miguel, who is certainly not a religious scholar and maybe not even religious, not an archeologist, indeed he is the only one of his siblings “not to go to university”, take an interest in something that happened nearly a half century ago? Why indeed would anyone other than perhaps some academic who specializes in the field?

 

At this point the plot has lost all credibility and I’m only about five percent into the story.

 

I persevere to the end of the book but, this question, the crux of the plot, is never answered to my satisfaction and the solution to the “mystery”, seems irrelevant.

 

Prero’s characters are extremely fond of using wise sayings, adages, aphorisms, parables, riddles, axioms or whatever you want to call them. Everyone from the Yoga master to the cab driver to the children use them and for every situation. Subsequently they have no significance. Since real people don’t talk that way, at least none that I’ve met, it hurt her characterization.

 

The author interjects words and entire passages in foreign languages. I for one could not understand them, but not to worry since she usually translated them in the next paragraph. What that is about I have no idea except perhaps it’s the author trying to

appear “learned”.

 

Much of the book doesn’t advance plot or develop character, instead it is a history lesson, travelogue and a food guide. For example I would guess more than half the chapters include a meal with the menu items explained in some detail. I suppose this this could appeal to some readers but I would suggest substantial editing could have been done in these three areas.

 

The writing randomly jumps from one character’s point of view to another’s and even frequently uses third person omniscient. There’s no rule against doing this except it’s confusing for the reader and a bit of a cop out as a writer. There are also frequent dumps of unmotivated backstory as well as character description.

 

I never did understand the relationships between Jaya, Daniel, Rose, Tal, Arielle and Yardin. I imagine all these characters were all introduced in the previous novel, Yoga for Detectives Lesson One, but it might be a good idea for Prero to consider not every reader is going to read every one of her novels and if they do, maybe not in the order they were released so these relationships need to be explained in every book.

 

For this reader Yoga for Detectives: Interconnected was more disconnected than interconnected.

 

30

 

Amazon Author Page: https:www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013287676486

 

           

 

 

Original post:
rodraglin.booklikes.com/post/1607749/yoga-for-detectives-interconnected-more-disconnected-than-interconnected

SummersEndBouquet_IMG_0126

This time of year is when theatre groups, big and small, amateur and professional, experimental or conventional unveil their new season.

I love live theatre. I was even a member of the Vancouver Playwrights Theatre Centre and under their mentorship wrote two plays.

One of the biggest thrills I ever experienced was to have professional actors perform a reading of my one-act play, Harry’s Truth. It was truly mind-blowing to witness other people interpreting my work in ways I never imagined while still staying true to the script.

To celebrate live theatre I’m offering the scripts of Harry’s Truth and End of the Rope free until December 31, 2017 to any individual, drama class, amateur or professional theatre group to read, workshop or produce. Here’s what one reviewer had to say about Harry’s Truth.

“You show the interactions between the five of them and let us have a glance at everybody’s past. A lot gets revealed in every scene. I like the detailed stage instructions and the symbolism in the last scene. One can read Harry’s Truth as if it were a short story. I’d really like to see this play on a stage someday…”

Often theatre groups are inhibited by the price of mounting a production. I will sign off on all production rights during that period and also authorize you to reproduce the copies of the script.

If you send me an email I’ll forward the website address and the coupon codes so you can download your free e-book scripts of Harry’s Truth and End of the Rope.

rod_raglin@yahoo.com

As the reviewer I quoted pointed out, these plays also make entertaining reading even if you’re not a theatre buff.

If anyone would like to take advantage of this offer I’d love to be involved as a script consultant or in any other aspect (no, I won’t pay to produce the production). Who knows maybe I’ll even come and see it.

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

30

Website:   http://www.rodraglin/com

Amazon Author Page:   https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00SD6LEU

Facebook:   https://www.facebook.com/Rod-Raglin-337865049886964/

 

 

 

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