Archives for the month of: October, 2015

TheWidowerE-bookCoverHello, Aunt Grace, it’s your nephew Rod calling. Rod. Norm’s son. On the west coast. Yes. Long time no talk, how are you? That long? He did? When? I’m sorry to hear that, I always liked Uncle Ted. Fred? Uncle Fred, of course. Anyhow, I’m writing novels now and I wondered if you had a computer?

 

My new novel, The Widower, has been submitted and accepted in the Kindle Scout program, Amazon’s new “reader-powered publishing platform for new, never-before-published books.”

What is Kindle Scout? Here’s how Amazon, the parent company, spins it:

Kindle Scout… is a place where readers help decide if a book gets published. Selected books will be published by Kindle Press and receive 5-year renewable terms, a $1,500 advance, 50% eBook royalty rate, easy rights reversions and featured Amazon marketing.

Here’s my take on it.

Anyone can now publish an e-book free with Kindle Direct Publishing. The trade-off is they get a thirty-five percent royalty. I would imagine there’s at least five million e-books listed on Amazon, the majority of which are spawned by Kindle Direct. How do I come up with this astounding statistic? My novel Not Wonder More, Mad Maggie and the Mystery of the Ancients is ranked 2,854,676 in the Kindle Store. It’s that high because its actually had a couple of sales. The current sales ranking of my other four books that makeup my bibliography is “unknown”, because, you guessed it, they’ve had no sales on Amazon.

For the last year I’ve been committed to reading the work of new, self-published authors and believe me there are a lot of books out there whose sales ranking is “unknown”.

Here’s what I’m getting at – it must cost quite a bit of money to churn out e-books that once published don’t sell a copy.

Kindle Scout gives Amazon the opportunity to choose the ones that will sell and put their resources behind them and make some money.

You see once your work is accepted it gets posted on the Kindle Scout site and reader’s can nominate it. If you make the cut you get the cash. It’s kind of a sure thing for Amazon since they already know by the number of people that nominate the book if it will sell.

If you win and get the contract does that mean you’ve written a blockbuster? Maybe, but it more likely means you’ve recruited every living soul you know or have virtually come in contact with to nominate your title.

So what, you (and Amazon) say? That’s how the game is played. To that I say, you’re right, but not by me.

But, hey, I’m not complaining. This is still an opportunity to get my work in front of a lot of people and I’m grateful to Kindle Scout and Amazon for the opportunity. It’s just that I’m just not going to run out and spend that advance – in advance. It’s not that I don’t have a lot of friends I can lean on…actually, it is.

The Widower’s Kindle Scout campaign will launch on October 24, 2015 12:00 AM EDT and last for 30 days. Here’s the direct link to my book if you’re inclined to nominate it.

https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/25MD9OLX9C88T

The Kindle Scout submission process is dead simple. Here’s what you need:

  • A complete, copyedited, never-before-published manuscript of about 50,000 words or more in Word format
  • A title and book cover image
  • A book one-liner of 45 characters or less
  • A book description of 500 characters or less
  • A short bio (500 characters or less) and your photo. You also have a chance to answer some canned questions about your book and personal story in a short Q&A section.
  • A thank you note of 500 characters or less. At the end of every campaign, Kindle Scout notifies readers whether the books they nominated were selected. The thank you note you submit will be included in the reader notification — no matter the outcome. This is a good opportunity to make a connection on a permanent basis via social media or email lists though neither have worked for me. It is, however, still polite to say thanks for your time and interest.

If you’re about to launch a book and you haven’t got this information at your fingertips, well, you’re not ready to launch a book.

Here’s the link to Kindle Scout https://kindlescout.amazon.com/

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs;

30

SPECIAL PRE-0RDER PRICE NOW AVAILABLE

Saving Spirit Bear – 99¢ if ordered before November 8, 2015

Loving the Terrorist – 99¢ Beyond Eagleridge Bluffs

– order before December 6, 2015

After pre-order dates regular price will apply $2.99

To pre-order go to

http://www. amazon.com/author/rodraglin

 

Video book reviews of self-published authors now at

Not Your Family, Not Your Friend Video Book Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH45n8K4BVmT248LBTpfARQ

Cover Art of books by self-published authors at

https://www.pinterest.com/rod_raglin/rod-raglins-reviews-cover-art/

My new novels, FOREST – Love, Loss, Legend and The BIG PICTURE – A Camera, A Young Woman, An Uncompromising Ethic are available on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU and as e-books at https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin

Visit my publisher’s website for excerpts from, and a buy link to my Eco-Fi series ECO-WARRIORS Book 3, Not Wonder More – Mad Maggie and the Mystery of the Ancients http://www.devinedestinies.com/?route=product%2Fauthor&author_id=92

ECO-WARRIOR Book 1, Saving Spirit Bear is available at http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

ECO-WARRIOR Book 2, Loving the Terrorist – Beyond Eagleridge Bluffs is now available as in paperback at

http://www.amazon.com/author/rodraglin

More of my original photographs can be viewed, purchased, and shipped to you as GREETING CARDS; matted, laminated, mounted, framed, or canvas PRINTS; and POSTERS. Go to: http://www.redbubble.com/people/rodraglin

View my flickr photostream at https://www.flickr.com/photos/78791029@N04/

Or, My YouTube channel if you prefer photo videos accompanied by classical music

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsQVBxJZ7eXkvZmxCm2wRYA

Advertisements

MauveIndigo_IMG_0075 copyI wrote this article about two years ago when I was trying to come to grips with success – more specifically, the lack of it. Not much has changed.

I thought I’d offer it up again for consideration and for those who seem to think “I’m only in it for the money” (what money?). Money/sales is the benchmark I use to measure my success. This article explains why.

Creativity is subjective. “I don’t know much about art, but I know what I like” – could be applied to a Bateman masterpiece or a black velvet reproduction from Walmart. This overused adage also applies to literature. It’s an excuse for a multitude of sins including a distinct lack of artistic ability as well as just plain bad taste.

So how does one decide whether their creation has any artistic merit? For me, if it don’t sell, it ain’t good.

Of course I to put it out there. I’ve offered my photographs to the public through various venues including retail stores, websites, flea markets, Craig’s List, and most recently stock photo sites – you name it, I’ve tried it.  My writing’s been sent off to agents, publishers, magazines, newspapers as well as posting it on various websites and now self-publishing.

Then I wait.

How long I wait depends on how patient or delusional I am, or both, at any given time. If nothing happens I may withdraw, I may persevere. I use to call it a “learning experience”, but now I understand that phrase as a euphemism for failure.

I’ve rationalize my lack of success with all manner of excuses – I’m ahead of my time; misunderstood; not commercial enough (a good thing?); the economy is in the dumps; the weather was rotten; the stars were misaligned; or, like Van Gogh, who only sold one painting in his entire life, my genius will be appreciated once I’m gone.

Six new photographs of mine were recently shown at The Metro Theatre Lounge Gallery. Theatre-goers could view my work prior to the show and at intermission for the entire run of seventeen performances. The Metro is a good venue. People who attend are inclined to the arts and have the time to take a look, unlike a coffee bar gallery where all you want is to get your latte and leave. The box office for that production was 1621 and I would imagine at least 1,000 patrons visited the lounge at least once.

There were no sales, nor any enquiries regarding my photographs. According to my own philosophy, there’s only one conclusion.

The reason I take this uncompromising approach to my work is so I’ll continue to strive to improve. When I look at my first public offerings, in either photography or writing, they were so awful I cringe even now as I think about them. Had I continued to assign any of the above excuses to the lack of response to these works I wouldn’t have attained what little success I have.

I’m still determined to create something good enough to overcome all the obstacles – real or imagined. What I lack in creativity I hope to make up in part with perseverance and the ability to learn from past mistakes and failures. There’s no shortage to draw from.

Until then, I can appreciate (and marvel at) the success of others while I keep honing my craft and perfecting my eye. It’s not about money. It’s about my passion for what I do and recognition from my contemporaries whom I respect.

Nietzsche said, “Art is the proper task of life…”,  and that may very well be the case, whether it sells or not.

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs

 

30

SPECIAL PRE-0RDER PRICE NOW AVAILABLE

Saving Spirit Bear – 99¢ if ordered before November 8, 2015

Loving the Terrorist – 99¢ Beyond Eagleridge Bluffs

– order before December 6, 2015

After pre-order dates regular price will apply $2.99

To pre-order go to

http://www. amazon.com/author/rodraglin

 

Video book reviews of self-published authors now at Not Your Family, Not Your Friend Video Book Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH45n8K4BVmT248LBTpfARQ

My new novels, FOREST – Love, Loss, Legend and The BIG PICTURE – A Camera, A Young Woman, An Uncompromising Ethic are available on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU and as e-books at https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin

Visit my publisher’s website for excerpts from, and a buy link to my Eco-Fi series ECO-WARRIORS Book 3, Not Wonder More – Mad Maggie and the Mystery of the Ancients http://www.devinedestinies.com/?route=product%2Fauthor&author_id=92

ECO-WARRIOR Book 1, Saving Spirit Bear is available at

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

ECO-WARRIOR Book 2, Loving the Terrorist – Beyond Eagleridge Bluffs is now available as in paperback at

http://www.amazon.com/author/rodraglin

More of my original photographs can be viewed, purchased, and shipped to you as GREETING CARDS; matted, laminated, mounted, framed, or canvas PRINTS; and POSTERS. Go to: http://www.redbubble.com/people/rodraglin

View my flickr photostream at https://www.flickr.com/photos/78791029@N04/

Or, My YouTube channel if you prefer photo videos accompanied by classical music

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsQVBxJZ7eXkvZmxCm2wRYA

CrowsHomeFlight_IMG_0024 copy copy 2Is this how it begins, commenting on comments until you’re sucked into the social media vortex?

I continue to mull over my first encounter commenting on comments about a topic I blogged (The myth that social media sells books – you can find it on this site). It was a four-way conversation (including myself) that ranged from the enlightening to the ludicrous.

It began with some cogent comments by Carpe Librum about the use of social media to promote book sales. I’ve taken some time to consider what she said and here are her quotes and my comments.

Carpe Librum: I wasn’t successful sales-wise until I published a book that appealed to the kind of readers that I am already connected with through Goodreads.

So she wrote a book that would appeal to her social media followers? I thought it was the other way around – you wrote a book and people that liked what you wrote started following you. Boy, have I got it wrong. I’d like to acquire some book sales but I don’t think I could write a book I wasn’t committed to just because I knew it would sell. However, if any one knows of a sure thing, please let me know.

Carpe Liburm: Previously, I wrote two children’s books that received positive reviews, but the word just never really got out about them. My adult historical fiction novel has been selling better than I would have hoped for, so I’ve looked at what I’ve done differently.

What has she done differently? Well, how about writing a book for adults instead of children and in an entirely different genre, unless there’s a children’s historical fiction category I’m not aware of.

Carpe Librum: Besides the audience that I already have a relationship with, I’ve joined a historical fiction Tweet group. We re-tweet each other on Twitter once each day, sharing each others posts with our own followers and greatly increasing the number of people that see each individual post. I have also done some guest blogging besides my own blog. I don’t know exactly what the magic formula was, but I have sold more copies of this book on some single days than I have my first novel since it was released.

My guess would be the “magic formula” is more likely what I mentioned previously – different genre, different age category. I’d want hard data on the effectiveness of re-tweeting tweets.

Which brings us to my remark that everyone took offense to – “Is it fair to let people assume you’re interested in them, in what they’re doing, by following or friending them when really you’re only interested in promoting your own agenda? Before you answer remember integrity is what you do when nobody’s watching.”

Initially Carpe Librum wrote: I agree that we can’t get too caught up in followers and likes, but I don’t think my recent book release would have gone nearly so well if it were not for my presence on Goodreads and Twitter especially.

Following my gibe about integrity her response was:

Carpe Librum: My efforts in the social media department do take time, but it has been rewarding in more than sales. I do indeed have many online connections that I consider friends.

Hmmm. Do I sense a contradiction there? Never mind, because what she does say in that same paragraph really makes sense.

Carpe LIbrum: I will say that if your attitude toward social media is that you have no intention of being social in terms of reading and commenting on other posts, then it is pretty much doomed to fail.

So there you have it, as they say, in a nutshell. Since I’m using cliche´s I might as well add a few more: You reap what you sow; nothing ventured, nothing gained; and many, many more that mean you get out what you put in.

Apparently, at least to those who would lead you to believe they actively engage with all their followers and friends on social media, the content of this blog for example, is not nearly as important as how I respond to the comments and reciprocate with “liking”, “re-tweeting”, “following” and “friending”. Troy (another contributor to this conversation) was right when he said, “It’s called social media for a reason. It’s social.”

Rats.

It appears I’ve failed in my first foray into the social part of social media. But, hey it’s not all bad, thanks to Troy I’ve learned a few things (though to use journalism lingo, they remain to be substantiated):

– most readers are introverts (I must be the exception. Misanthropic, yes, introvert, no).

– people who dedicate time and energy on a blogging site are introverts who need an outlet to talk, make friends and share ideas. (Oh, dear).

– you lose customers one at a time (tell that to Volkswagen)

– negative word of mouth travels faster than news – actually at warp speed. (Wow! Now if only I could figure out some way to use negative word of mouth to promote my books)

– the opposite of caring isn’t hatred, it’s apathy and, besides nobody cares. (I’m not sure about the first part, but the second part I’m beginning to believe)

– I’m clueless and have little grasp of deeper meaning. (No argument there)

– there actually is a website for quotes by Princess Leia http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0000008/quotes

Net result of this experience is no sales, no more traffic than I’m aware of and I’ve gained one more follower on BookLikes. Go figure.

You can read the blog that started all this The myth social media sells books on WordPress at

https://rodraglin.wordpress.com/2015/10/03/the-myth-that-social-media-sells-books/

Or you can read the BookLikes version of the blog with the original comments at

http://rodraglin.booklikes.com/post/1264405/the-myth-that-social-media-sells-books

You can visit Carpe Librum on BookLikes site at

http://carpelibrum.booklikes.com/

or at her blog at

http://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.ca/

You can find RedThaws Reads Randomly at

http://redthaws.booklikes.com/

You can find Troy on his BookLikes blog at

http://troy1138.booklikes.com/

Thanks to everyone. Let’s do it again some time.

WildflowersV

Recently I wrote a blog entitled “The myth that social media sells books” (you can scroll down and read it if you like). I summarized my experience of the previous month where a couple of sites re-posted my blog and others re-tweeted it, blah, blah, blah and so on.

The bottom line was despite exposure to about 20,000 new people who “follow” or “like” these sites on social media the result was zero book sales.

I know you’ve read this before and probably really wish I’d get over it and mostly I have, though occasionally I have a slip, like last month. But wait, this time someone actually responded to my rant and it wasn’t some generic “like”, the equivalent to if you show me yours than I’ll show you mine.”

OMG!!!!

The comment appeared on BookLikes, one of the sites where I post my blog. It was articulate and put forth a different point of view, even asked for my opinion.

I responded, others chimed in, and then the fun began.

I don’t want to prejudice any reader(s) so rather then give you my interpretation of this online conversation (that’s up next), I thought I’d post it in it’s entirety. If you’re an author there’s actually some ideas about how to promote your book you might find useful. If you’re not you might find it interesting how an innocuous online conversation can spiral out of control.

This may be commonplace for all I know, not being one to engage in online chats, but I found this exchange fascinating in an unproductive sort of way.

I’d be interested in hearing comments though it’s not likely I’ll respond, follow, friend or even like you.

So here begins the thread (or is it the stream) with the first comment about my blog:

Carpe Librum: On the other hand, you have to have a platform or nobody will know your books exist. I agree that we can’t get too caught up in followers and likes, but I don’t think my recent book release would have gone nearly so well if it were not for my presence on Goodreads and Twitter especially. My blogs on historical topics related to my book topic also tend to increase sales on the days that I promote them on Twitter. Where do you think book promotion is most effective?

Rod Raglin (that’s me): Thanks for reading my rant and your question.

Where do I think book promotion is most effective? I have no idea, though I’m glad you’ve had positive response using social media. It could very well be the problem isn’t social media, but my writing. The solution in that case is to try to write better books and believe me I’m trying.

(This is the end of the short answer. You might want to quit here.)

Among my artistic friends, most (all) more talented the me, when the topic of our moribund careers come up, and we really don’t obsess about it, well, maybe we do, the consensus now is you need to build a critical mass of followers. How to do that and keep your integrity intact seems to be a challenge.

Other suggestions are to have someone famous endorse your work, like a Kardashian?

Hmmm. Do those young ladies actually read? Does it matter?

When I get frustrated I go back and consider why I write:
– I love it. I mean, I actually can’t think of many things I’d rather do than sit in a room by myself and create a fantasy world. Really.
– I love the research. I always go where I’ve never been before. It might be the career of a character, it might by a plot line, it might be a setting, it might even be a new approach to writing.
– I enjoy the connection, like this with you, Carpe. The interaction and discourse with other writers and readers.

Success would be icing on the cake.

I’m open to suggestions, yours or anyone else out there. How do you promote your books? If you’re a reader, what attracts you to a new book?

I’m listening – and grateful.

Carpe Librum: I wasn’t successful sales-wise until I published a book that appealed to the kind of readers that I am already connected with through Goodreads. Previously, I wrote two children’s books that received positive reviews, but the word just never really got out about them. My adult historical fiction novel has been selling better than I would have hoped for, so I’ve looked at what I’ve done differently. Besides the audience that I already have a relationship with, I’ve joined a historical fiction Tweet group. We retweet each other on Twitter once each day, sharing each others posts with our own followers and greatly increasing the number of people that see each individual post. I have also done some guest blogging besides my own blog. I don’t know exactly what the magic formula was, but I have sold more copies of this book on some single days than I have my first novel since it was released.

Rod Raglin: Some good ideas here, but I think you may have just written an excellent book. Still, I’m going to start looking for a Commercial/Literary/Eco-Fi/Contemporary Romance Tweet group so we can re-tweet each other’s tweet tweets …or something like that.

Carpe Librum: Ha! You may need to create that group, though I think there’s a ASMSG group that does general fiction. My problem with that is then you end up having to tweet a bunch of romance.

RedThaws Reads Randomly: Rod, just a suggestion, but Carpe Librum and several other authors on BookLikes follow at least some of their Followers, and interact with them. Not saying that that helps them, but my perception as a reader is that it does. Just saying.
I wish you luck. I’ve read your reviews with pleasure, not your books yet, but one of them is on my TBR. Based on what I’ve seen you write on here, I’m expecting it to be a pleasure to read.

Carpe Librum: I do try to interact here mostly as a reader. If I have ever annoyed anyone with too much talk about my books, they haven’t made me aware of it.

RedThaws Reads Randomly: Carpe, if you stopped interacting here, you would be missed.

Troy’s Blog: Hi. I got redirected here by RedTHaws, thought I’d take a look. Hope my two cents are worth something. I don’t use Facebook or Twitter, and I barely even look at Goodreads anymore. The reason I read Samantha’s (Carpe Librum’s) book is because it was in my wheelhouse. The reason I pre-ordered it and read it immediately is because we interacted about it and had a common interest. She’s friendly and awesome, so that helps too. Turns out, it was worth the immediate shift in gears too. But what led to that? She made the choice to follow me, which led me to discover her through our interactions on blog posts we both write.

The point of what I’m trying to say is this. youI don’t know what your schedule is like or how much you want to put into this, but sometimes the least likely can be the most effective. Odds are good Samantha would never have found me otherwise. Turns out, I’ve made a friend, and she got a loyal reader.

Carpe Librum: Thank you! That is very sweet of you to say.

Troy’s Blog: You earned it honestly.

Carpe Librum: *blushes* I hadn’t even seen Troy’s post yet! You guys are giving me an ego boost and warm fuzzies today!

Troy’s Blog: Behold, the power of reaching out and making friends. And I say that as a bona fide hermit.

Carpe Librum: Yes, it’s a good thing we’ve all met online rather than in person or we would never speak to each other. Weird species, introverts.

Troy’s Blog: Weirdest of the weird, absolutely. lol

Rod Raglin: Sounds like we’ve got a budding online romance going here – blushing, honesty, warm fuzzies, sweet, reaching out. OMG! I’m happy for you both and to think it was initiated by something I wrote – actually something negative. As Troy says, that’s “weirdest of the weird”.

Let me inject a little bit of reality into this conversation, that would be my reality, not necessarily anyone else’s.

I use to recruit friends, followers, tribe members, whatever. One day I was bragging to my wife about how virtually popular I was and she said, “Do you know any of these people?” No. “Do you read their Facebook posts or Tweets?” No, of course not. I mean, if I did there would be no time to do anything else – like write. “Then what makes you think they’re reading anything you post?”

Don’t you hate it when someone does that? Actually makes sense. Isn’t it always worse when it’s your partner?

So, here’s the question – is it fair to let people assume you’re interested in them, in what they’re doing, when really you’re only interested in promoting your own agenda?

Before you answer remember integrity is what you do when nobody’s watching.

This could all change if Red actually reads that book of mine on her TBR list and posts a review – well, maybe not, but I’d think about it.

I’m glad Samantha (may I call you that or is it still too early?) has found Troy, or is it the other way around. I’m really glad Troy bought her book, since that’s what it’s all about, or have I got that wrong.

Could I be like Carpe, friendly and awesome as Troy says? Could I seize the day or at least a follower as apparently she has?

Would it really make a difference – where it counts?

Troy’s Blog: Yeah, you got that wrong. I made friends with Samantha before I knew she was a writer (or what that little icon saying she was meant). And yes, it would make all the difference with the introverted. Most people who read are introverts. Most people who dedicate this much time and energy on a blogging site are introverts who need an outlet to talk and make friends and share ideas.

In the words of Princess Leia, “If money is all you love, then that is all you’ll receive.” Except you won’t, because on a social media site, nobody will care if you don’t. But your honesty is appreciated. Saves me time, effort, and, well, money. The old business adage… you lose customers one at a time, and negative word of mouth travels faster than the news.

As to integrity… nobody questions mine.

Good luck to you. You’ll need it.

Troy’s Blog: Oh, did I mention? BL is a very tight-knit community. Word travels very fast here. Looks like that negative word of mouth is already traveling at warp speed, and I didn’t even have to point it out. Congratulations on being clueless.

Rod Raglin: Sorry you took offense, Troy. I did say this is my reality and not necessarily anyone else’s – obviously not yours.

I try not to be delusional and believe me it’s a struggle. The only way I’ve found I can gauge my success as a writer is through sales. Please tell Princess Leia it’s not about the money (what money?) it’s about improving as a writer.

Most people who read are introverts? Interesting.

Please continue to spread the word that I’m a nasty piece of work. Being big on adages you probably know this one, “even bad publicity is better than no publicity.”

Carpe Librum: I think that we were just disappointed that we had reached out to you, offered advice, and attempted to involve you in the Booklikes community, and it felt like we were, well, brushed off, to say the least.

I will say that if your attitude toward social media is that you have no intention of being social in terms of reading and commenting on other posts, then it is pretty much doomed to fail. My efforts in the social media department do take time, but it has been rewarding in more than sales. I do indeed have many online connections that I consider friends.

Troy’s Blog: Again you misunderstand. I have no reason to spread any word against you. You were offered a golden opportunity to make the most of the Booklikes community. You slapped down the offering hands. It’s a shame, but… so be it. If you don’t care, there’s no reason any of us should either. It’s like anything else. The opposite of caring about something isn’t hatred. It’s apathy. I merely state that the word is out, and I have done nothing to spread it. That’s just the nature of the beast in a tight-knit community. The difference here is that this community will keep talking about the things that matter. You’ve had your 15 minutes of infamy. Nobody cares after that.

For someone who’s stock in trade is words, you seem to have little grasp of deeper meaning.

Whew! So there you have it.

You can read the blog that started all this, The myth social media sells books,on

BookLikes with the original comments at

http://rodraglin.booklikes.com/post/1264405/the-myth-that-social-media-sells-books

You can visit Carpe Librum on BookLikes site at

http://carpelibrum.booklikes.com/

or at her blog at

http://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.ca/

You can find RedThaws Reads Randomly at

http://redthaws.booklikes.com/

Troy blogs on BookLikes  at

http://troy1138.booklikes.com/

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

30

leaves_IMG_0075Could something finally be happening?

Was I finally beginning to break through?

Was the digital void finally beginning to listen?

This September I wrote an article for BookLikes, in response to their #recommendaway series where members recommend titles or themes of books they’re interested in. My theme was indie authors. Then they invited me to be a guest blogger and I submitted my article on “Rushing to Publish” (see it here in the archives).

Booklikes has 3,143 followers on Twitter and 4,605 “likes” on Facebook. I don’t know how many members they have but they claim to be “The number one blogging platform for book lovers and the best way to discover new books”.

Then I discovered Promocave http://promocave.com/ “A place for authors to find readers, and for readers to find books”. I posted my books with blurbs free and submitted two articles, both which they published. Promocave says they have16,046 followers on Twitter and 645 “Likes” on Facebook.

This blog is getting boring even for me, but hang in there.

Partly because of being featured on these two sites my Twitter activity was up a bit over 30 percent with an increase of impressions from 3719 to 5393. Visits to my website were up 19 percent from 520 to 642.

I was getting excited. Could all this activity mean…?

So here’s the punch line – you know it already, right?

All this new exposure and all this increased activity I didn’t sell me one book in the past month.

That’s nearly 20,000 new people on Twitter and over 5,000 on Facebook who “discovered” me and had the opportunity to turn their interest into sales.

This is further evidence to me, like I needed it, social media does not sell books. It also hints at something far more significant. Social media perpetrates the myth of popularity, but when put to the test, nobody out there really “likes” you, “follows” you or supports you as a member of their “tribe” enough to buy your books.

So, if you’re and author, the best way to sell your books is, well, I don’t know, but certainly not through social media.

However, if you want to continue to be delusional, and I have to admit it often seems more appealing than reality, keep those postings coming.

Oh yeah, the answer to those questions at the beginning of this blog?

NO – to all three.

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

30

SPECIAL PRE-0RDER PRICE NOW AVAILABLE

Saving Spirit Bear – 99¢ if ordered before November 8, 2015

Loving the Terrorist – 99¢ Beyond Eagleridge Bluffs

– order before December 6, 2015

After pre-order dates regular price will apply $2.99

To pre-order go to

http://www. amazon.com/author/rodraglin

 

Video book reviews of self-published authors now at

Not Your Family, Not Your Friend Video Book Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH45n8K4BVmT248LBTpfARQ

My new novels, FOREST – Love, Loss, Legend and The BIG PICTURE – A Camera, A Young Woman, An Uncompromising Ethic are available on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU and as e-books at https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/raglin

Read Reviews https://readersfavorite.com:book-review:39014

Visit my publisher’s website for excerpts from, and a buy link to my Eco-Fi series ECO-WARRIORS Book 3, Not Wonder More – Mad Maggie and the Mystery of the Ancients http://www.devinedestinies.com/?route=product%2Fauthor&author_id=92

ECO-WARRIOR Book 1, Saving Spirit Bear is available at

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

ECO-WARRIOR Book 2, Loving the Terrorist – Beyond Eagleridge Bluffs is now available as in paperback at

http://www.amazon.com/author/rodraglin

More of my original photographs can be viewed, purchased, and shipped to you as GREETING CARDS; matted, laminated, mounted, framed, or canvas PRINTS; and POSTERS. Go to: http://www.redbubble.com/people/rodraglin

View my flickr photostream at https://www.flickr.com/photos/78791029@N04/

Or, My YouTube channel if you prefer photo videos accompanied by classical music

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsQVBxJZ7eXkvZmxCm2wRYA

%d bloggers like this: